News

School spirit “floats” out the window this Homecoming season

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Homecoming this year was a bit emptier at the football game and pep rally. This  is the first year in decades that the traditional floats weren’t present during the annual Homecoming festivities. What prompted these changes? Students voted and administration responded.

According to Homecoming Moderator Jonathon Spurlock, this isn’t the first time McNick has seen conflict arise with the student interest in the floats. “The same issue came up around 4 years ago. Administration believed that there was a loss of interest in floats so a vote was held, but unlike this year, students overwhelmingly voted to keep them and pledged to work on them.”

This year, the common response among students seemed to be, “Yes, we want the floats, but no, we’re not going to work on them,” as conveyed through a vote taken in homeroom in September.

While the floats were a fun display of school spirit at the Homecoming football game and pep rally, how much of that spirit could really be credited to the majority of the student body?

Senior Alana Osterday has been actively involved in floatbuilding since her freshman year. “While I definitely enjoy the floats, I was expecting them to be taken away because of the lack of interest in helping build them seen among each grade,” Osterday said.

Traditions like the floats run solely on student support, which Spurlock believes to have steadily decreased each year.

“Tradition is tradition, but sometimes things change,” Spurlock said.

So what kind of change is happening this Homecoming in the halls of McNick? The bulletin boards in the glass hallway have been designated to each grade to be decorated to their corresponding Disney Pixar movie theme.

Senior Sydney Baker, who was also involved with floatbuilding in years past, likes the idea of doing something smaller and less stressful, but is going to miss sharing the floats with our outside community.

“Now it’s just a board in a hallway that doesn’t get as much recognition and takes away from the purpose of displaying our school spirit,” Baker said. “The floats had been a tradition for decades, and to see them go was incredibly sad.”

With the current freshmen not experiencing floatbuilding at all, and the most familiar students being less than interested, the return of the floats doesn’t seem to be in the near future. And with the bulletin boards showing more black and white than color and spirit, the search to bring spirit back to Homecoming is to be continued.

About Kayla Abbitt

Kayla Abbitt is a first year Journalism student and staff reporter for the Milestone. She is a member of the cross country team, a peer mentor, and a three year student ambassador. In her free time you will find her with her friends and listening to music.

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Theology teacher Teresa Davis' E Bell Comparative World Religions' class celebrates the traditional Indian holiday of Holi on May 15. Students paid $2.50 each to participate, throwing the colors on the practice field in Paradise.

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