Student Life

Tell me about yourself: Ways to master the college admissions process

Applying for colleges is in no way an easy task. Sifting through all of the mail is tiring, there’s still so much to get through on the common app, and thinking about how to pay for more education is already too much to handle. But don’t panic just yet. While you edited your essays and filed your FAFSAs, the Milestone found the best ways to make sure you ace your interviews and get the most out of your college visits.

Be respectful of the interviewer.

The person who just sat down across from you could be the person deciding on whether or not you will be admitted, so do not take this lightly. Be punctual, look excited but calm, introduce yourself, and shake the interviewer’s hand. All of this will show that you’re a responsible student who takes education seriously.

Be prepared for the most common questions.

You will be asked a select few of questions at every interview. Education-portal.com advises you to practice how you will answer them. However, you be sure not to over-rehearse. A list of common questions can be found on collegeapps.about.com, and tips on how to answer the most daunting question of them all can be found here on YouTube.

Know the college.

Before going on the visit, research the college.  Look up basic information on the school’s website like campus size, class sizes, and programs they offer. Look at other websites too because college websites will only highlight the best parts of their college. Other websites will give a different angle on the college. Finding an unbiased view of the college will help you be better prepared.

Come with questions, both for the interview and tour.

At this point, you should already know some of the basic information about the school. Try to avoid questions whose answers can easily be found after spending a few minutes on the college’s website. Ask about crime rates, policies on cars, the social aspect of the campus, how long it takes to cross campus, what percentage of classes are taught by professors vs. teaching assistants, or what students do in their free time.  Guidance Counselor Matt Wehrman suggests you come with many questions and ask them all!

Choosing a college is a big task, so make it easier for yourself and follow the advice above. For more tips, watch VideoCollegeAdvisor’s videos on YouTube.

Co-written with Miranda Roesel

About Gabrielle Quesnell

Senior Gabrielle Quesnell is an Advanced Journalism student. She enjoys reading and finding new music and is involved in Academic Team.

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Photo of the Week

Theology teacher Teresa Davis' E Bell Comparative World Religions' class celebrates the traditional Indian holiday of Holi on May 15. Students paid $2.50 each to participate, throwing the colors on the practice field in Paradise.

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