Student Life

A First-Timer’s Guide to the OGT: Do’s and Don’ts for taking the test

The Ohio Graduation Test (OGT) may seem daunting and intimidating to sophomores about to take it for the first time, and this is completely understandable. A weeklong test that students have to pass to graduate? Who wouldn’t be at least a little nervous? But don’t fret just yet. It’s not as frightening as it seems. In reality, the OGT is just an application of knowledge that has been learned thus far in high school.

With this test only a few days away, it may seem like a nightmare. Why take a test on material you can’t study? Why do we have to take it for an entire week? Because the State of Ohio says so.

 

In order to answer these questions about the OGTs, follow these tips to lessen that ever growing anxiety.

 

Do take it seriously

Some students fall under the idea that this is all a joke and that it doesn’t really matter how well you might do or if you even pass. The OGT is a graduation test. It aims to make sure you are prepared for the next few years of your education. Do your best so your results accurately represent your ability. And yes, to receive a diploma, every student must pass all five parts of the test before May of their senior year.

 

Don’t worry if you do not pass a section

Even though this is a graduation test, your life will not be over if you do not pass a section. You will have the opportunity to retake a section two times your junior and senior years so that you can graduate. During the week of March 23, 2015, students who were either absent or did not pass a section will have the chance to retake that designated section.

Senior Gabbie Latreille gave a little advice, “Trust your education; they aren’t as hard as they may seem.”

 

 

Do arrive on time to your designated classroom

During the week of OGT testing, the testing schedule and class times and locations will be emailed to every sophomore taking the OGT. The teachers assigned to these classrooms every morning are taking the time to make sure you have everything you need during this OGT. Respect their time as teachers, but also your own. When you show up on time, you are giving yourself the best opportunity to use every minute of the allotted time. And try not to be absent during OGT week.  It’s easier to take the test the day it’s given and not to miss more class time the following week to make up a section you missed.

 

Don’t make a lot of noise or talk if you are finished before time is called.

Taking a standardized test is not like going to Kings Island for a day. It may not be the most exciting thing to do, but if you finish your test section before time is called, check over your answers. You must remain quiet during the entire testing time. Sure, there will be people around you who are finished as well, but there will also be people who are not finished yet. They deserve the same quiet atmosphere that you received when you were taking the test as well. If you do make noise, the teacher may take your test and destroy it, making it invalid resulting in a failing test score.

 

Do get a good night’s rest

Each and every student has heard this a thousand times, but there is something to this. Pulling an all- nighter right before a big test is not a good idea. The OGT requires you to go back into your mind and pull information you have learned over the years. This is much easier to achieve with a well-rested body and brain. A sleep deprived brain can impair judgment, reaction time, and many other thought processes.

“I would stress not to freak out and come with extra number two pencils,” Guidance Counselor Kaitlyn Richter said.

Don’t share your test scores

No, it doesn’t truly matter if you share your scores or not but like any other test, your scores are not your friends’ business. If someone asks to see your test scores, ask them why they might need to see them. You do not need to compare with them, or compete to see who had the higher score. It only matters if you passed, so keep it that way.

 

The OGT testing will take place during the week of March 16, 2015. Along with this week, the schedule will change to accommodate for the testing times. During the first and second bell of each day, sophomores will complete the designated section for that day. Also, if a student does not finish in the time allotted, they will have additional time during third bell to complete it, a total of 2.5 hours to complete each section each day.

 

English hall, like many past years, will be used for testing due to the lack of students traveling to classes. This will allow a quieter environment for the students taking the test.

 

The schedule for all students for the week will be as follows:

Monday, March 16: 1, 2,3,4,5,6,7,8

Tuesday, March 17: 2, 3, 4 1, 5, 6, 7, 8

Wednesday, March 18: 7, 8, 1, 2, 5, 6, 3, 4

Thursday, March 19: 4, 3, 2, Mass, 5, 6 7, 8, 1

Friday, March 20: 8, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 4

 

Sophomores will follow the schedule once they have comp

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leted their testing each morning.

 

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Photo of the Week

Theology teacher Teresa Davis' E Bell Comparative World Religions' class celebrates the traditional Indian holiday of Holi on May 15. Students paid $2.50 each to participate, throwing the colors on the practice field in Paradise.

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